Category Archives: Silverweed: a supernatural fairy tale

Birthday EBook Giveaway

Hi Friends,

4 of my 5 eBooks will be free on  July 9th. This will give you a chance to grab a book you missed or become a first time reader.  (I have five eBooks, however, only four are eligible for giveaways at this time. )

Jaclyn's Ghost

Jaclyn’s Ghost by Dorlana Vann

Jaclyn’s Ghost by Dorlana Vann

Ghosts, Mystery, and Fashion.

Can this diva solve her own murder, or will she be stuck in limbo forever?

Supernatural Mystery, Romantic Comedy

Amazon U.S. (Kindle)

Amazon.co.uk (Kindle)

Supernatural Fairy Tales

Supernatural Fairy Tales by Dorlana Vann

Supernatural Fairy Tales by Dorlana Vann

fairy tale + paranormal element = supernatural fairy tale

a collection of paranormal short stories inspired by fairy tales

Silverweed by Dorlana Vann

Silverweed: a supernatural fairy tale by Dorlana Vann

Silverweed: a supernatural fairy tale by Dorlana Vann

In this Little Red Riding Hood-inspired supernatural fairy tale,

the roles of prey and predator become interchangeable.

  Young Adult, Dark Fantasy

Amazon US

Amazon.co.uk

The Princes of Tangleforest by Dorlana Vann

The Princes of Tangleforest by Dorlana Vann

 

The Princes of Tangleforest by Dorlana Vann

How do you change Frogs Nerds

into Princes the popular kids ?

Young Adult, fairy tale inspired

Amazon U.S. (Kindle)

Amazon.co.uk (Kindle)

Superstition References in Silverweed: a supernatural fairy tale

 

Silverweed by Dorlana Vann

Silverweed: a supernatural fairy tale by Dorlana Vann

 

The superstition references in Silverweed are a combination of my grandfather’s stories and an informative superstitions dictionary.

I’d never really been that superstitious, except for doing things like tossing salt over both my shoulders—yes, both because I didn’t know which one was correct. However, my interest sparked in 2006 when my mom told me about my grandfather’s childhood stories. Apparently, his mother (pictured on the right – my great-grandmother – I think I kind of look like her) died when my grandpa was five-years-old; it happened the day after she’d told him to stop shooing the birds away that had landed on their front porch, because it meant death.
My grandfather had also told my mom that one day he had watched the devil walking out in his Alabama woods, pitchfork and all. (You might recognize this from the first chapter of Silverweed.)

Around the same time my mom was reminiscing, I was writing the rough draft of the the Little Red Riding Hood inspired short story, and all of these memories set the entire mood for “Silverweed Muffins” which eventually became Silverweed the novel.

As I was writing the story, I researched superstitions. It took me awhile but I finally found a reference book I really liked, Dictionary of Superstitions by David Pickering. Even if you don’t need the book for reference, it’s interesting to see how our lives today are influenced by these superstitions from the past. BTW – the correct shoulder to throw salt over is the left one.

Paperback and eBook  available

(Special limited time price of .99 cents for Kindle eBook) 

Amazon US

Barnes and Noble

Amazon.de

Amazon.co.uk

Free Ebook – Silverweed: a supernatural fairy tale

Hey Guys,

Silverweed: a supernatural fairy tale is a young adult, fairy tale inspired dark fantasy.  It will be free for two days this week. Below is chapter 1 if you want to check it out first.

Silverweed by Dorlana Vann

Silverweed: a supernatural fairy tale by Dorlana Vann

Free August 16 &17

Amazon US

Amazon.de 

Amazon.co.uk

paperback  is also available

Silverweed: a supernatural fairy tale

by Dorlana Vann

Chapter 1 Once Upon A Time

Aiden Young stared out the window of the rental car. His mom, Lucy, had described early fall in Indiana as spectacular, but they’d missed autumn altogether, and she’d failed to mention that the heart of winter was so freaking bleak and bitter. He pulled a pen out of the spirals of his notebook and forced himself to ignore the poem he had written about Summer, his newly ex-girlfriend, on the previous page. On the next blank page, he wrote:

Sunlight…
shivers through the claws
of dense skeleton branches

“What are you writing?” his mom asked from behind the wheel, rescuing him from comparing the cold poem to the way he felt. “I would love to hear something. You haven’t shared your poetry with me in a long time. You know, I still have the very first one you wrote to me. Let’s see, it went… ‘Mommy, mommy—’”

“Hey!” He cleared his throat. “Umm… are you sure you turned down the right road?” He couldn’t stomach his mom’s “when you were a little boy” stories, even if guilt did nudge at him. He knew in her mind the reason he had tagged along was so that they could spend time together. In real life, her trip on the same weekend Summer had planned to come over had been perfect timing, and that’s all. Summer wanted serious answers, and he didn’t even want to talk about it, didn’t want to think about it. “It’s been forever since I’ve seen a house. Only trees and more trees and dead trees…”

“Nervous?” She smiled as she glanced back and forth from him to the road, her new, short hairstyle bouncing to the movement.

“You not watching the road is making me a little jumpy.”

“No, I think city boy is scared of the woods.” She gave a quick laugh before saying, “Granny once told me she saw the devil out there. Pitchfork and all.”

“Well, if I was scared, that wouldn’t help.”

His mom watched the road in silence for a moment. “How much do you remember about my family?”

He shrugged. “I remember Augustus was a jerk.”

“I’m sure he’s changed by now.”

“Right.”

“I hope some other stuff has changed, too,” she mumbled. “There are a couple of things about them you probably don’t remember.”

“Wait!” Aiden pointed. “There’s a house down that hill. Is that it?”

“That’s it.” She made a sharp left.

As they drove down the driveway, Aiden frowned. The house was old and worn, the paint peeling like someone had raked the white two-story from the top of the black trim down to the dead bushes. The windows, with a brownish build-up on the glass, didn’t catch a single reflection. But the porch actually triggered a memory. He knew it wrapped the entire house because he remembered running around and around it when he was a little boy.

Lucy parked beside a red BMW. “I don’t remember it being so—”

“Spooky?”

“I was going to say old. Anyway, how do I look?” She sat up straight and examined herself in the rearview mirror.  Aiden didn’t say anything because after the first fifty times he had told her she looked fine, he’d realized she wasn’t listening for an answer. She was just nervous. They had almost missed their plane because she had changed her outfit a few hundred times. She had finally settled on black slacks, black leather jacket, pastel shirt, and low heels.

Aiden opened the car door. His Texas winter coat, actually a thin jacket, was no match for the icy wind. Since it had been shorts weather back home, he was thankful that at least he had worn long pants. As he walked toward the house, he tucked his hands inside his pockets and tried to look down at much as possible to keep the miserable cold from hitting his face.

Lucy knocked on the front door and looked around at the containers of flowers, plants, and condolence wreaths on the front porch. “I don’t see the one I sent.”

The door opened abruptly. Aiden had been seven the last time he saw his cousin, but he recognized the guy with dark, slicked-back hair and swollen eyes, one green and one blue, as Augustus. He wore jeans and an unbuttoned black shirt, which revealed a chain that dangled down a muscular chest.

“What?” His cousin’s voice sounded groggy, like he had been woken from a nap.

“Augustus? Hi. Remember us? Aunt Lucy. And this is Aiden.”

Augustus remained unenthused. “Oh,” he said, walking away. He left the door wide open, presumably for them to follow.  Aiden had half expected the inside of the house to look as unkempt as the outside. Other than the sheet-covered frame that hung on the wall with only a tarnished corner peeking out, there was nothing wrong or special about the spacious foyer. He glanced at the formal dining room, which was to the right, and at the hallway, stairs, and ramp on the left.

As they followed his cousin into a warm living room, Aiden noticed Augustus’ hair wasn’t short like it had first appeared but hung down in a pony-tail.

“Whoop,” Aiden said as he tripped on the corner of the rug.

Augustus turned and glared at Aiden. “Watch your step.”

Aiden smoothed the rug with his foot in case it was expensive or something. “Sorry, man.”

“The last thing we need around here is more bad luck,” Augustus said.

“Oh, everything is fine,” Lucy offered. “Aiden’s just real clumsy.”

“Mom!”

She looked at Aiden sternly, as if to say, “Please, play along.”

“Right…” Aiden said with full sarcasm. “I’m a klutz. I fall down all the time.”

Augustus shook his head and walked to a chair that faced a blazing fireplace. A dozen or so pillar candles, at all stages of being burned, lined the mantle. A sofa, a wooden console television that looked so ancient Aiden doubted it received cable, and a small end table furnished the rest of the room.

They stood behind the sectional like two dummies. Slowly, Augustus swiveled around. “Sit down,” he said. After they made it to the front of the couch, Lucy only sat on the edge, clearly uncomfortable. “Augustus,” she said. “I don’t know how to express how sorry we are.”

“Diesel,” Augustus said.

“I’m sorry?” Lucy replied.

“My name is Diesel.”

“Oh! Your middle name. When did you start going by your middle name?”

“Five years ago.”

“Oh,” she nodded. “How… are you?” She smoothed her hair. “Are you doing all right?”

“The funeral was yesterday,” he said.

“Yeah. I know, and I’m so sorry. I hoped we could drive out to the gravesite.”

“You missed your own sister’s funeral.”

“I know. I know. We really tried to get here on time but the airport, you know, and Christmas. It’s insane. Trying to rent a car was…”

Diesel shifted in his seat.

Lucy cleared her throat. “How’s Granny?”

“She’s sleeping. Do you want to see her?”

“Nooo, not if she’s resting.”

“I’ll be right back.”

When Diesel jumped up and walked out of the room, Aiden tried to exhale the tension with a silent whistle. The fire crackled as they sat waiting.

They both turned when they heard a loud knock coming from above. A railing supported by carved wooden balusters edged the open landing. “Gran,” Diesel said loudly. “Aunt Lucy and Aiden are here. Finally.” The bedroom door creaked open.

After he heard the door shut, Aiden leaned over to his mom and whispered, “Man, he sure did get weird.”

“Well, he’s been through a lot. He just lost his mom.”

“Sorry.” Aiden felt bad for a second. But still… “What was with the rug and bad luck stuff, and you making me look like such a dweeb?”

“I didn’t mean to. I was trying to make him feel better. It’s so strange. I had no idea Augustus believed in all that stuff, too.”

“Diesel,” Aiden corrected with a smirk.

She nodded. “I mean Diesel. They’re all a little different… a little superstitious, old-fashioned.”

“How do you mean, superstitious? Black cats and stuff?”

She nodded. “It seems like every little thing. You see, the reason Diesel got upset earlier is because stumbling is suppose to be bad luck in general.”

“How do you know that?”

“I grew up with all of it.”

“But you’re not superstitious.”

She leaned in closer to Aiden and whispered, “Because I knew all the old wives’ tales, omens, and folklore Mom told me and Rose were only make-believe, like fairy tales. Now Rose, she soaked it all in and actually believed. But she didn’t go all,” she waved her hands, “you know until…”

Aiden shook his head because he didn’t know. His mom rarely brought up her sister in conversation.

“Well, when she was pregnant, her boyfriend, Harley, ran off and left her. I think something completely snapped. Even though I had already moved out by then, I heard she took it hard. At least that S.O.B. left money for Diesel when he died.”

“She’s not feeling very well,” Diesel said from directly behind them. They both jumped. “She wants to know if you guys can go up there.”

“Sure, sure,” Lucy said, her face bright red.

They followed Diesel into the foyer and up the stairs. After a few steps up, the stairs turned to the right. Aiden could see over the banister, down into the living room.

When they arrived at Granny’s door, Aiden’s heart thumped in his chest. He hadn’t seen her in ten years. His own grandma, a stranger. He could also sense his mom’s anxiety; she took her time walking inside the room.

Granny sat in a recliner covered by a worn quilt. Her grey, bushy eyebrows went all the way across and met in the middle of her brow. Her cheekbones sank in, and her long, silver hair draped over both of her shoulders.

“Lucille, you came,” Granny said, her voice ungrateful.

“Mom,” Lucy said. “How are you?”

“I’m hanging in there.”

“I’m so sorry about Rose.” Lucy leaned over and gave her mom a distant hug. “I can’t believe she had a heart attack.”

“I don’t believe it, either. Doctors. All of them, money hungry. Hmph, it doesn’t matter, anymore. She’s gone. Rose is gone.” Aiden heard the door close behind him. Diesel had left the room.

“She was a good daughter,” Granny said. “I could count on her. Always here for me.” She looked at Aiden. “My, my look at you. Come give Granny a hug.”

Aiden walked over to Granny’s stretched out arms and hugged her, smelling the scent of grassy earth. He pulled away, and she smiled warmly.

“It’s so good to see you in person,” she said. “I’ve been sent pictures, but it’s not the same. Look at you. You remind me of your grandpa; he was tall and thin.” She looked around Aiden. “Where’s my new grandson? How old is he now, two? Seems a shame, a grandmother never even getting to meet her own grandson.”

“He’s three and… he has a cough, and I thought it would be easier.” Lucy cleared her throat. “Mike stayed home with him.”

Granny eased her attention over to Lucy. “I see. So when are you running off? I guess it’s just as well, anyway.”

Lucy straightened and smiled curtly. “There’s something I need to talk—”

“You can stay in your old room if you want,” Granny interrupted. “It’s the same. We haven’t changed a thing in case you ever decided to come home. Aiden, honey, you can take the guestroom downstairs. I’m feeling quite weak. Please ask Diesel if there’s some leftovers from Rose’s friends that I can have for my supper tonight. Rose always made supper…”

“I’d be happy to cook,” Lucy said.

“I suppose that will do. Turn the light out when you leave.”

Lucy stood for a second, wringing her hands, and then took a couple of steps to the bedside table and snapped off the lamp. The room went dim but not dark because of the daylight sneaking in from the window. Lucy turned abruptly and left the room. Aiden smiled at Granny, feeling awkward. “See ya,” he said before following his mom’s exit and shutting the door behind him.

Aiden caught up with Lucy on the stairs, mid-ramble. “She chose to live with Rose, and now she’s acting like I abandoned her or something. She wouldn’t even give me a chance to ask her. What makes me even think she would want to move in with me?”

“It was a little soon to ask, don’t you think? Hi. Condolences. Want to pack up and move across the country?”

“Shhh. Why don’t we go to the car,” she said as they reached the foyer, “and we can talk.”

Once in the car, Lucy placed her hand on her cheek as she stared out the front windshield. “I hope you can understand why I need to do this.”

“I know, you and Dad explained it all at home. I mean, she’s old, and you don’t think a college kid like Diesel can take care of her.” Ever since his mom had brought up her plan, he had been apprehensive, especially since his mom suggested she extend the invitation to Diesel, too, at least until after the holidays. However, after seeing Diesel, he didn’t think he had to worry about him wanting to bunk together. He didn’t seem the type. And, since Diesel was legally an adult, he could have the entire house to himself. Aiden knew what he would pick if he was given the choice.

“I didn’t realize it would be so hard,” his mom said, speaking more to herself than to Aiden. “I can’t believe she’s saying I ran off. I didn’t run off. I got married… I couldn’t bring myself to come back very often because every time I did, Rose acted and looked so strange, like a witch or gypsy or something. I couldn’t stand to see her like that. She used to be so pretty. The last time we came here, I swear she was in the kitchen making some kind of potion.”

“Cool, magic potions.” Aiden imagined his aunt standing over a black cauldron, stirring it with a long wooden spoon.

“She wasn’t normal,” she whispered and wiped her eyes. “I tried to tell Mom that I wasn’t sure Rose should be taking care of anyone and to come live with us. Of course she wouldn’t hear anything bad about her Rose. She chose her over me… So it’s not my fault. But I really didn’t mean for ten years to pass. Now I feel like a terrible daughter and sister.” Lucy inhaled a long breath and let it out quickly. “I’ll never see Rose again, you know.”

“I’m sorry.” Aiden pulled a t-shirt out of his duffle bag from the backseat and handed it to his mom to wipe her tears.

“I know it’s too late to make it up to Rose, but maybe I can help Mom and be there for my nephew. He doesn’t have a mom or a dad now. We’ll sit down and have a nice dinner and discuss everything with them, as a family. I’m sure they’ll see that it’s the best solution. Right?”

“Right…”

“I’m sorry. I really didn’t mean to get all into that.” She nodded and patted him on the leg. “I’m so glad you decided to come with me. I can’t believe you chose to spend your holiday with me. It means a lot to me.”

“Sure, Mom.”

“Let’s just get the bags—”

“Wait a minute,” he said. “You’re not suggesting we sleep here, are you?”

“We don’t have a choice. After dinner it’ll be too late to drive very far. You saw downtown. Did you see a Holiday Inn?”

They had driven straight through Kingwood, Indiana. Surrounded by worn-down shops sat an old, two-story courthouse, complete with bell tower and soaring front steps that led to a columned porch. Unfortunately, he hadn’t seen anything that even resembled a modern hotel.

Lucy said, “Anyway, aren’t you the one who told me I should take my time?”

“Yeah, but I meant during the day and after we checked into a hotel that had room service.”

“It’s only for the one night.” Lucy sighed and stared at the house. “How bad could it be?”

He didn’t look forward to being in the house at night; it already had a creepy Poe atmosphere during the day. He imagined Diesel looming over his bed with a butcher knife chanting, “You’re bad luck. You’re bad luck…” Aiden shuddered. “Right,” he said.  “How bad?”

Free August 16 &17

Amazon US

Amazon.de 

Amazon.co.uk

paperback  is also available

Free Supernatural Fairy Tale

Hi Friends,

The Kindle eBook version of Silverweed: a supernatural fairy tale is free today and tomorrow.

Werewolf,  Young Adult, paranormal fantasy inspired by

Little Red Riding Hood

Once upon a time Granny was attacked by a werewolf. Eighteen years later her grandson, Aiden Young, arrives in Indiana for his aunt’s funeral, and his unfortunate discovery of the family secret leads to a fatal mistake. Before the weekend is over, he’s trapped by a blizzard along with his superstitious cousin, Diesel, and Scarlet, Diesel’s manipulative girlfriend. In his grandmother’s spooky, old house in the middle of the woods, the teen faces life and death decisions: who can be trusted, and who needs to be saved? However, he must first figure out what the true monster is… werewolf or fear. Because in this Little Red Riding Hood-inspired supernatural fairy tale, the roles of prey and predator become interchangeable.

Silverweed by Dorlana Vann

Silverweed: a supernatural fairy tale by Dorlana Vann

The Beginning of Silverweed:

Silverweed started out as a short story in 2006,  titled, ”Silverweed Muffins.” In 2008, I used the short story as inspiration for my National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) novel. I did use ”Little Red Riding Hood,” for inspiration. However, it is not a “retelling” of the fairy tale but a werewolf novel that was inspired by it.  Two years later,  it was finally ready for the world, and Silverweed: a supernatural fairy tale the eBook was published Nov 2010 and the paperback followed June 2011.

Amazon US

Amazon.de

Amazon.co.uk

The Beginning of Silverweed:

Silverweed started out as a short story in 2006,  titled, ”Silverweed Muffins.” In 2008, I used the short story as inspiration for my National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) novel. I did use ”Little Red Riding Hood,” for inspiration. However, it is not a “retelling” of the fairy tale but a werewolf novel that was inspired by it.  Two years later,  it was finally ready for the world, and Silverweed: a supernatural fairy tale the eBook was published Nov 2010 and the paperback followed June 2011. (The only paperback I have available at this time.)

Spoiler alert: In order to give an overview of inspirations and research process for the book, it seems I may have given away a few plot points in the following write-up…

Why a werewolf?

A werewolf seems like a pretty obvious supernatural element for Little Red Riding Hood, seeing as there is already a  wolf in the original tale (I used the  Grimm Brother’s version  as inspiration) and in some other original versions there are even werewolves. But my thought process for this was even simpler. I asked myself, “What if the wolf was the grandma? And that’s why the wolf was in a nightgown…

Werewolf Research:

I admit it; I didn’t do a lot of research on werewolves for Silverweed. But I have an excuse. I wanted my characters to be pretty dumb about them, too. I didn’t want them to have any preconceptions of them. I wanted the werewolf to be a mystery—this half wolf, half man monster that they (I) only knew about through pop culture.

Little Red Riding Hood as inspiration:

Silverweed is not a retelling of Little Red Riding Hood. It was inspired by my short story which was inspired by Little Red Riding Hood. I used some of the same background and plotlines as the short story, but when I drafted my novel, I added a theme – a theme that I interpreted from the fairy tale. And to me, Little Red Riding Hood is all about fear, the message being, “Don’t talk to strangers,” and “Don’t stray from the path.” So Silverweed’s theme ended up being: The real monster is fear.

I also added a little fun (as well as discipline) when I decided to use lines from the Little Red Riding Hood as my chapter titles and chapter inspirations. And if you read the chapter titles in order, they actually give a condensed version of the Grimm Brother’s Little Red Riding Hood. I also used them to kind of guide me through the book. One example is Chapter 9 – The Wolf Knocked at the Door: Diesel discovers he was bitten by the werewolf.

Superstition Background:

The superstition references in Silverweed are a combination of my grandfather’s stories and an informative superstitions dictionary.

I’d never really been that superstitious, except for doing things like tossing salt over both my shoulders—yes, both because I didn’t know which one was correct. However, my interest sparked a few years back when my mom told me about my grandfather’s childhood stories. Apparently, his mother (pictured above – my great-grandmother – I think I kind of look like her) died when my grandpa was five-years-old; it happened the day after she’d told him to stop shooing the birds away that had landed on their front porch, because it meant death.
My grandfather had also told my mom that one day he had watched the devil walking out in his Alabama woods, pitchfork and all. (You might recognize this from the first chapter of Silverweed.)

Around the same time my mom was reminiscing, I was writing the rough draft of the the Little Red Riding Hood inpired short story, and all of these memories set the entire mood for “Silverweed Muffins” which eventually became Silverweed the novel.

As I was writing the story, I researched superstitions. It took me awhile but I finally found a reference book I really liked, Dictionary of Superstitions by David Pickering. Even if you don’t need the book for reference, it’s interesting to see how our lives today are influenced by these superstitions from the past. BTW – the correct shoulder to throw salt over is the left one.

 

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,596 other followers

%d bloggers like this: